Music for Valentine’s Day

 

I heard a whimsical cello tune this morning at 8:57 that made me smile. It was from an operetta called Violettes Impériales. The song is “L’amour est un bouquet de violettes,” or “Love Is a Bouquet of Violets.” The composer is Francis Lopez. The musicians were the Prague Philharmonic Orchestra. Sol Gabettta played the cello. I couldn’t find the exact recording on YouTube, so I picked the two videos below. The first I love for the art; the second shows how lovely the music is on the piano.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Related image

 

 

 

 

Enrique Granados–“12 Spanish Dances”

 

 

I have spent some time this morning learning about the Catalan composer Enrique Granados and some of his compositions, and his life, and his family. He is from the same region of Spain as Pablo Casals, and was just as famous in his lifetime. One morning, I heard a portion of the “12 Spanish Dances” and was really enjoying them. Afterward, the name of the composer stuck with me.

Here are the “12 Spanish Dances” for piano.  Guitar renditions follow for some, as well as a couple of his other pieces. Enjoy!

 

spanish dancer: Flamenco. Dancing girl and guitarist. Vector illustration Illustration

 

On Wings of Song, by Mendelssohn

I have heard a version of On Wings of Song for violin and piano on my classical music station. Sometimes it will be late at night, and other times around seven in the morning. I have no idea who the musicians are, but I think it’s beautiful. Listen! It’s a joy to listen to.

And here’s a piano version, accompanied by an English translation of the German poem. I love the art as well.

 

 

 

Songs without Words–Mendelssohn

I’ve heard only some of Mendelssohn’s Songs without Words on the radio. I really like them, so I searched on YouTube for a complete set, below. Here’s a little more background. After a day of listening to rock and gospel, they are very calming.

In a related article, here are six more love songs without words by different composers. I’ll look them up later.

In the meantime, enjoy Mendelssohn.

 

 

Happy Fourth of July!

Here’s some information about the Star-Spangled Banner. Enjoy this unique video!

And here’s an article on the top ten July 4th songs, according to The Nation.

Have a great day, everybody!

uly 4th clip art

 

 

And even though it doesn’t have anything to do with today, I always liked Handel’s Music for the Royal Fireworks. It was one of the first classical records I ever bought.

“The Alley Cat” by Bent Fabric

I used to have a 45 rpm record of this instrumental, “The Alley Cat” by Bent Fabric. I hadn’t thought of it for a long time, but the fun graphic below helped me to recall it. Enjoy!

In a web search, I also found Augie’s Records, which looked intriguing.

 

 

Image result for Free clipart Himalayan cats

Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata

On Tuesday, November 4, I voted. By the time I started back home it was dark, and I was having trouble adjusting to the time change. I happened to look up, and i saw a full moon. That made me think of the “Moonlight Sonata.” Here is that recording in full:

As one YouTube commenter suggested, it’s very tempting to turn the stereo all the way up. Enjoy!

The Transformative Power of Classical Music–A Classic TED Talk

I recently subscribed to TED Talks, and I really enjoy them. Saturday’s post fits this blog to a T. I decided to post it here. It’s a charmer!

I also gained some new perspectives on Chopin, a composer I enjoy but don’t know all that much about. I don’t think I’ll ever hear Chopin in the same way again. The speaker, Benjamin Zander, has an interesting background.

And here’s some Chopin music. Enjoy!

Music to Wake By

Thank goodness for the daily online playlists at Classical WETA 90.9 FM! Yesterday I woke up to Mozart’s Piano Sonata in C, K. 545.

The tune is very familiar, and it always struck me as very bright and cheery. I’m glad to finally know the title. Here it is:

 

While I was browsing this evening, I discovered this other Mozart piece, which Classical Music Only  refers to as Mozart’s greatest violin work:

 

 

 

 

 

Music to Wake Up By

This morning before getting up, I heard this piano piece called “Silhouette: Op. 8” by Antonin Dvorak. I had not heard it until now, and I just thought it was pretty:

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